ICOLACE 2012

International Conference On Learning And Community Enrichment

Traders Hotel, Singapore

Monday 16 July – Tuesday 17 July 2012

PROCEEDINGS

from the 2ndInternational Conference On Learning And Community Enrichment (ICOLACE)

Traders Hotel

1A Cuscaden Street

Singapore

16-17 July 2012

ISBN 978-0-9872206-1-5

 

 

INDEX OF PRESENTATIONS

Day 1: Monday 16 July

10.00am – 10.30am

Opening address by Chris Picone, Chairperson ICOLACE 2012

10.30am – 11.00am

Presentation regarding involvement by students in local community projects, Singapore by students and teachers from Our Lady of Good Counsel School (OLGC):

Teachers: Ms Oh Bee Ling and Ms Sim Seok Woon

Students: Samantha and Leah Mary (Primary 4 Integrity Class)

11.30am – 11.50am

Enhancing Life-wide Learning and Sustainable Development via an Academic Course

Marion G. Ben-Jacob, Mercy College, USA

11.50am – 12.10pm

Learning for the Environment: A teaching experience with Semi-Scripted Role Play

Siew Nyet Moi, School of Education & Social Development, University of Malaysia Sabah

12.10pm – 12.30pm

Why is teaching CSR in schools & universities necessary?

Ming Wong, Frankfurt, Germany

12.30pm – 12.50pm

Accounting Teaching and Education Driven by Extrinsic Motivators of Students’ Learning

Annie Yuet-ngo Mok, City University of Hong Kong

12.50am – 1.10pm

Lifelong Learning in the Knowledge Economy-Challenges for Taiwan

Prof. Tsai Ching-Hwa, Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen University and

Chen I-Yin, Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan

1.20pm – 3.00pm

Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback

3.00pm – 4.00pm

Optional workshop session for participants who wish to introduce Lifewide PROGRESS Reports into their local schools, led by Christine and Chris Picone

 

Day 2: Tuesday 17 July

10.00am – 10.20am

“Green Math” – Mathematics and Environment

Dr. Ilana Levenberg -“ Gordon” – Academy College of Education, Israel

Dr. Dorit Patkin – Kibbutzim College of Education, Israel

10.20am – 10.40am

Telling My Story: Developing narratives of Self, Culture and Country in multimedia projects with young (multilingual) Indigenous Australians

Susan Kennedy, Lecturer, Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, Australia

10.40am – 11.00am

Cooperative Learning (CL) and student formation

Javiera Mena, Research Higher Degree Student, School of Education, University of Queensland, Australia

11.00am – 11.20am

Second presentation regarding involvement by students in local community projects, Singapore by students and teachers from St. Anthony’s Primary School:

Teacher: Mr James Han

Students: Prudence and Angel

11.20am – 11.50am Morning tea Poster Presentations:

Effectiveness of Teamwork Education Program for Multidisciplinary Undergraduates

Mei-Jin Chen-Sea, Emeritus Professor, Institute of Allied Health Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

Burnout of Teachers and Work-related Musculoskeletal Discomfort

Jer-Hao Chang OTR, Department of Occupational Therapy, National Cheng-Kung University, Taiwan

11.50am – 12.10am

The impact of service learning on character development

Rossana Chen, Regional Manager, Adam Khoo Learning Technologies Group Pte Ltd, Singapore

12.10pm – 12.30pm

Life-wide Learning in Universities: Internship & Voluntary Work in CityU, Hong Kong

Andrew Chan, Associate Professor, Department of Management, CityU, Hong Kong

12.30pm – 12.50pm

Use of 3G services for effective penetration of education in rural India

Dipankar Mishra, Pusa Polytechnic, India

12.50pm – 1.10pm

Promoting Children’s Ideas for Better Living Environment:

Environmental Education Programme for Children Living in Deprived Urban Housing

Paramita Atmodiwirjo & Yandi Andri Yatmo, Department of Architecture, University of Indonesia

1.20pm – 3.00pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback

3.00pm – 3.20pm

How To Build a Community School : A Principal’s Journey To Opening A New School In Contemporary Outback Australia

Adam Voigt, Director, Adam Voigt Education Solutions, Australia

3.20pm – 3.40pm

Students’ Perception on the Use of Facebook in a Literature Class

Thelma Victoriano Villaflores

3.40pm – 4.00pm

Impact of recession on buying behavior of Indian Consumers

Anurag Shrivastava, & Dr.Pradip Manjrekar, Padmashree Dr.D.Y.Patil University, Mumbai, India

4.00pm – 4.20pm

The relationship between pre-service teacher’s perceptions towards active learning in Statistic 2 course and their academic achievement

Vanny Septia Efendi, Bachelor Education Student, Sampoerna School of Education, Jakarta, Indonesia

4.20pm – 4.40pm

Online Rubric Assessment Tool for Marine Engineering Course

C.S.Chin & Ivan C.K.Tam, School of Marine Science & Technology, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

4.40pm – 5.00pm

Presentation from staff of Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools Centre of Excellence, Republic of Kazakhstan

4.40pm

Official close of conference by Chairperson

Virtual Presentation

Accidents in Academia: An Incident-Report Safety Knowledge Transfer Model

Abdulkadir M.SABA

Department of Government and Civilization Studies, Faculty of Human Ecology, UPM, Malaysia

PROCEEDINGS

Day 1: Monday 16 July

10.00am – 10.30am

Opening address by Chris Picone, Chairperson ICOLACE 2012

Opening Address

 

Day 1 – Session 1:

10.50am – 11.00am

Presentation by teachers and students from Our Lady of Good Counsel School,

Singapore about local student involvement in lifewide learning

Teachers: Ms Oh Bee Ling and Ms Sim Seok Woon

Students: Samantha and Leah Mary (Primary 4 Integrity Class)

Abstract

OLGC’s commitment to a caring, nurturing environment based on values is built on the vision of our Founder Blessed Nicholas Barre. This gave rise to our vision of developing Ladies of GRACE and Character, Leaders of the future as well as the school’s core values of Compassion, Humility, Integrity and Perseverance (CHIP). Our students practise values learnt through Community Involvement Programmes which focus on service to class, peers, school and community. There are also numerous fundraising projects in aid of different charities.

While we ignite the passion to serve the community with compassion, the school has also sown the seeds of love and care for the environment in our pupils through many green initiatives and programmes. To heighten the commitment level of our pupils in community service, they take personal responsibility through the initiative of student-driven goal setting.

OLGC PowerPoint

Day 1 – Session 2:

11.30am – 11.50am

Enhancing Life-wide Learning and Sustainable Development via an Academic Course

Marion G. Ben-Jacob, Mercy College, USA

Abstract

Technology supports a global learning environment. It supports learning about different cultures, different ways of life, and tolerance, as well as specific subject matter. Global learning needs to be encouraged in the educational environment of our students. Technology has facilitated the retrieval and integration of information into our lives and the learning environment. As such, technology is an integral tool for sustainable development. We need to be familiar with differences and similarities from the perspectives of economic development, environmental responsibilities, and social programs to make the world livable and fair for all. To prepare our students for the future, life-wide learning is a venue we need to pursue. Providing students with settings and authentic contexts will help them develop skills they cannot develop as well in a traditional classroom.  Yet, the traditional classroom plays a strong role in the development of well-rounded students. Fundamental skills are needed for proficiency in life-wide skills. We need to insure the proficiency of our students in the basic competencies, including reading with comprehension, sound critical inquiry abilities, including the retrieval and evaluation of information, writing grammatically, and a basic understanding of mathematics concepts. We need to begin the reinforcement of these competencies at the initial stage of higher education to build a solid foundation for future courses as well as to encourage our students as lifelong, life-wide learners who support and contribute to sustainable development.  We need to prepare them for an evolving educational and professional environment that is global in nature.  We present a detailed description of a college/university level course, required for all incoming freshman that focuses on fundamental competencies that are required for in-class and life-wide learning. We describe the format of the course, exercises, and projects. In addition, we suggest concepts and information that would enhance even this existing course.

Ben-Jacob PowerPoint Ben-Jacob Paper

 

Day 1 – Session 3:

11.50am – 12.10pm

Learning for the Environment:  A teaching experience with Semi-Scripted Role Play

Siew Nyet Moi

School of Education & Social Development, University of Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia

Abstract

Getting students to act out their roles and to apply appropriate arguments for and against their position as defined by the role is a challenge in investigating an environmental issue through role-playing. This action research addressed this concern by exploring how a semi-scripted role play could be used to promote active student learning in a Science, Technology and Society (STS) lesson. Using greenhouse effect as an example of environmental issue, students playing different characters were explored how to articulate their response to the semi-scripted role-play setting. A group of 26 master students who took Science, Technology and Society (STS) as a core course took part in research and carried out a role-play in groups of six for a period of two hours. Multiple data sources were used consisted student’s written reflections, Role Play Evaluation Form and an informal and unstructured observation. Overall, the students indicated that the semi-scripted role play helped them understand an environmental issue both from their own and other’s perspective. The findings also showed that engaging students in semi-scripted role play enabled him/her to feel empowered to express, share, argue, and negotiate more comfortably and confidently. In addition, students thought that the role play helped them to develop critical thinking. The role-play had helped create an engaging and productive learning experience that educators could use this exercise to lead students in the exploration of broader local environmental issues.

S N Moi PowerPoint

Day 1 – Session 4:

12.10pm – 12.30pm

Why is teaching CSR in schools & universities necessary?

Ming Wong,

Business Trainer and Writer, Frankfurt, Germany

This PowerPoint presentation focused on why it is important to introduce students to Corporate Social Responsibility before they enter the workforce so that it becomes part of their workplace thinking, planning and action.

Ming Wong PowerPoint

Day 1 – Session 5:

12.30pm – 12.50pm

Accounting Teaching and Education Driven by Extrinsic Motivators of Students’ Learning

Annie Yuet-ngo Mok

City University of Hong Kong

 Abstract

Understanding students’ motivation on learning and studying provides better insight for accounting educators to their designs and delivery of teaching and education. This paper focuses on an approach to explore the extrinsic motivators of accounting students on their learning of accounting subjects. Students’ desire to excel in their future careers is an important extrinsic motivator that deserves more effort of educators. Students’ desire to excel in their future careers usually starts with their desire to join a big four firm. This papers explores recent extrinsic motivation factors of accounting students derived from the recruitment materials and published information of big four accounting firms as reflected in their websites.

 

Day 1 – Session 6:

12.50pm – 1.10pm

Lifelong Learning in the Knowledge Economy-Challenges for Taiwan

Prof. Tsai Ching-Hwa, Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen University and

Chen I-Yin, Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen University

Abstract

Human face structural shifts in production and labour markets, growing anxieties in everyday life, and now a deepening world economic and financial crisis. At the same time, globalization and the knowledge economy force us to update and adapt our skills and competences to new work environments, social organization and communication types. In order to deal with these issues, people have urgent learning needs and motivations. Thus, lifelong learning, a new type of learning, became a popular concept. We recognize that adult learning and education represent a significant component of lifelong learning process, which including a learning range from formal to non-formal to informal learning.  Literacy is an important part of the right to education. It is also an indispensable foundation in all learning stage. Literacy is an essential means of building people’s capabilities to cope with the evolving challenges and complexities of life, culture, economy and society. In many developing countries, the literacy would be a major problem. The poverty of capabilities from wealth gap and aging would be a real challenge. This paper will discuss the relation between lifelong learning and knowledge economy, then explore the problems and solutions of lifelong learning development. Following the studies, several concerns and future implications for Taiwan are suggested.

Chen I-Yin PowerPoint

Day 2:  Tuesday 17 July

Day 2 – Session 1:

10.00am – 10.20am

“Green Math” – Mathematics and Environment

Dr. Ilana  Levenberg, “ Gordon” – Academy College of Education, Israel

Dr. Dorit Patkin, Kibbutzim College of Education, Israel

 

Abstract

As practitioners of mathematical education, we decided to combine between mathematics activities and environmental studies. Based on the standards of the N.C.T.M, which emphasize this aspect, asserting that this type of relationship between mathematics and other areas shows the applicability of mathematics and develops comprehension, and most of all shows how to save the environment, for all of us.   Likewise, the issue of proper mathematics learning depends first off all on the way they are taught and explained in school.  The activities tried in two teacher college classes and in school- grade5 and 6.   In the method of activity using the “green math” the learners wander around the globe and home environment exposed to the world of numbers, calculations, geometry, graphs, history of mathematics, interesting discoveries in mathematics and science and the connection between the concepts from environment studies.  At the conference our activities and students work will be demonstrated and more detailed findings will be presented, as well our approach and recommendations for mathematics teachers how to improve the acquisition of mathematics as relevant and important issue.

8a Ilana Levenberg & Dorit Patkin PowerPoint

Day 2 – Session 2:

10.20am – 10.40am

Telling My Story: Developing narratives of Self, Culture and Country in multimedia projects with young (multilingual) Indigenous Australians.

Susan Kennedy

Lecturer at the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, Australia

 Abstract

English as a second language teachers are challenged by students with minimal language proficiency but blessed by their students’ interests in technology, multimedia and social networking.  Multiliteracy models that utilize technology and social and visual media and communicative, process-based approaches inspire learners to explore interests and skills to communicate more in English.  This presentation focuses on the implementation of a short, interest-based program of learning in English for students in an isolated community in the Northern Territory where English is rarely spoken.  Students spoke the dominant language Murrin Patha alongside other endangered clan languages.  Using an autobiographical narrative approach to teach English through multimedia, learning English became a way to communicate personal identity, cultural stories and connections to the environment with the local and online community.  The presentation discusses how English can be taught in ways that utilise other languages and draw on key curriculum themes of globalization, technology and sustainability.  The ESL field is attuned to the changes in the way English programs are being delivered to meet local and global contexts, having implemented multiliteracy models and communicative, processed based  approaches for some time.  The presentation discusses how a program of English was delivered through multimedia projects to meet the needs of a specific group of learners, using approaches adaptable to any context and provide a base for continuous learning and skill development beyond the course.

Susan Kennedy PowerPoint

Day 2 – Session 3:

10.40am – 11.00am

Cooperative Learning (CL) and student formation

Javiera Mena

Research Higher Degree Student, School of Education, The University of Queensland,  Australia

Abstract

Cooperative Learning (CL) involves students working together in small groups to accomplish shared goals. Research demonstrates that with CL, students acquire verbal, cognitive and social skills. Furthermore, it is an effective pedagogical strategy for including children with special needs. Even though it is important for future learning that students learn how to work together in the early years, very few interventions with CL have been implemented in early childhood education. This may be because of the common and erroneous belief that young children do not have a developmental capacity for cooperation. Another reason/factor may be that teachers do not provide the conditions in their classrooms for CL to happen.  The beliefs teachers hold about pedagogy is a crucial determining factor for their behaviour inside the classroom.  The objective of the proposed study is to identify and understand the beliefs, attitudes, intentions and behaviors of Chilean early childhood teachers regarding the use of CL in their classrooms. For this, a first qualitative study will be conducted for the elicitation of beliefs of early childhood teachers in Chile. Then, a second quantitative study will permit to confirm if the information elicited reflects the beliefs of a bigger sample of teachers. A last case study will be raised to identify and describe in substantial detail an example of a practice of CL in order to identify some characteristics/ features/ aspects that are unique to Chile in a deeper way in some particular cases from public and private school. These three studies will give some understanding of the actual possibility of performing this behavior and the factors that influence the possible use or non-use of CL. The results will permit further interventions to be designed regarding the use of CL, considering the beliefs of teachers in their particular context and also replicate the good practices increasing the effectiveness of CL pedagogy when it is implemented in a Chilean context. At last, a third case study will be raised to understand in a deeper way some cases in a Chilean context regarding the use of Cooperative learning.  The conference presentation will provide a summary of the initial observations from studies undertaken as part of the above research including reference to wider benefits of CL towards the holistic formation of students.

Javiera Mena PowerPoint

Day 2 – Session 4:

11.00am – 11.20am

Second presentation regarding involvement by students in local community  projects, Singapore by students and teachers from St. Anthony’s Primary School:

Teacher: Mr James Han

Students: Prudence and Angel

St Anthonys PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 5: Morning tea poster presentation 1:

11.20am – 11.45am

Effectiveness of Teamwork Education Program for Mutidisciplinary Undergraduates

Mei-Jin Chen-Sea

Emeritus Professor, Institute of Allied Health Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

Abstract

A Clinical Teamwork Education (CTE) program based on a framework of Knowledge-Attitude-Practice (KAP) model was used to facilitate the development of the teamwork attitudes into students’ fieldwork practice. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the CTE program on multidiscipline undergraduates. Twenty-four senior students, including 7 medical students, 7 nursing students and 10 occupational therapy students, participated in the 8-week CTE program at a neurological ward. The TeamSTEEPS Teamwork Perceptions Questionnaire (T-TPQ) was used to assess students’ learning and teamwork perceptions before and after the program. Data were analyzed with Wilcoxon tests. All students significantly improved their perceptions on the following subscales of the T-TPQ: team structure, mutual support and communication. There were no significant differences in the subscales of leadership and situation monitoring. Additionally, medical and nursing students indicated that they were satisfied with the learning effect of this CTE program. All students expressed they had learned the importance of teamwork practice for improving the quality of patient care. Our findings demonstrated that the CTE program was a successful model to enhance multidisciplinary undergraduates’ teamwork performances.

Mei-Jin Chen-Sea Poster Presentation

Day 2 – Session 6: Morning tea poster presentation 2:

11.20am – 11.50am

Burnout of Teachers and Work-related Musculoskeletal Discomfort

Jer-Hao Chang OTR

Department of Occupational Therapy, National Cheng-Kung University, Taiwan

 Abstract

School teachers are in charge of inspiring students to learn. However, the teachers tend to advocate the overwhelming stress in teaching very frequently. Their burnout under such stress may result in work-related musculoskeletal discomforts (WMSD) in various body parts. This study investigated the correlation between the burnout and WMSD of the school teachers in Taiwan. One hundred and fifteen teachers in primary schools, one hundred and four teachers in junior high school, and eighty-nine teachers in senior high school were recruited as subjects to answer both the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Nordic Muscular-symptoms Questionnaire anonymously. The statistics software (SPSS®) was used to examine their statistical significance.

All the three subject groups were found to have moderate high emotional exhaustion (EE) and moderate low depersonalization (DP) as well as moderate personal accomplishment (PA) according to Maslach Burnout categorization. More than 70% subjects reported musculoskeletal discomforts due to their work. Shoulders, neck, and lower back were the body parts with most complaints in order. The teachers with more emotional exhaustion in primary school and junior high school committed that the muscular discomforts interfered their work in statistical significance. Disciplining student behaviors was responded as main stress source for all three subject groups. The burnout of the school teachers in Taiwan was correlated with the prevalence of WMSD. Such WMSD and burnout could affect the sustainable development for teachers in education career.

Jer-Hao Chang Poster Presentation

 

Day 2 – Session 7:

11.50am – 12.10am

The impact of service learning on character development

Rossana Chen, Regional Manager/Learning & Development Manager,

Adam Khoo Learning Technologies Group Pte Ltd, Singapore

 

Abstract

Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten. B. F. Skinner, 1964.  The world’s education landscape is changing rapidly and becoming increasingly global. We come face to face with series of unprecedented political, ethical, economic and educational issues, especially in the last decade when we see the world ruled by much flux and uncertainty in the social dynamic. The fall of the dotcom; upheaval in technology, globalization and intensifying competition, the horrific 9-11, 2006 Asia Tsunami . The aftermath of all these threat will lead to the new dimension of education in the 21st century.  How successful the new generation is at exploring the emerging opportunity and tackling the challenges depend critically on the training that harnesses them with lifewide quality and excellent character development.   Through service learning theme and serving the community, students learn about themselves and improve their academic grades.  Students’ progress will be tracked by the number of late coming, number of offence, their sleeping hours and their academic grades.

Rossana Chen PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 8:

12.10pm – 12.30pm

Life-wide Learning in Universities: Internship and Voluntary Work in CityU, Hong Kong

Andrew Chan

Associate Professor, Department of Management, CityU, Hong Kong

Abstract

PowerPoint presentation on Summer Internship Programmes organized in conjunction with Hong Kong Young Industrialists Council (HKYIC)

Andrew Chan PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 9:

 

12.30pm – 12.50pm

Use of 3G services for effective penetration of education in rural India

Dipankar Mishra

Pusa Polytechnic, India

Abstract

India is a leading country in the field of technical education. Its technocrats are in demand all over the world. But the heart of India, the rural belt ,is neglected. Rural education in India is in shambles. Lack of teachers, both in qualifications and physical presence, along with lack of infrastructure, are the real culprits. Wherever they are available, their appearance in the schools and colleges is at a premium. The government also finds it very convenient to engage them in duties like census, etc. Consequently students in the rural sector are deprived of basic education. Development of telecommunication facilities, particularly mobile telecommunication can be used to increase the penetration of education in rural India and also provide quality education. With 3G services rolled out all over the country, it can be used as platform for spreading education in the rural sector. Further availability of cheap mobile handsets with a number of features can help in increasing the footprint of education in the rural sector. This paper provides a method of providing education to rural India using the available infrastructure at a very low cost to the government.

Dipankar Mishra PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 10:

 

12.50pm – 1.10pm

Promoting Children’s Ideas for Better Living Environment:

Environmental Education Programme for Children Living in Deprived Urban Housing

Paramita Atmodiwirjo & Yandi Andri Yatmo,

Department of Architecture, University of Indonesia

Abstract

An important dimension of education for sustainable development is awareness on the issues and problems in the environment where we live. This is particularly important for children as the next generation who would become agent of change in the future. It is important to enhance the children’s capacities to transform their environment to become a better place to live. Education for better living environment becomes especially relevant for the children from disadvantaged families who live in poor, high-density urban areas. Living in a deprived condition of environment does not necessarily limit opportunities to aspire for a better life. Children in such disadvantaged conditions need to be encouraged and enabled to develop their environmental knowledge and skills, allowing them to build vision for their future actions towards better environment.  This paper highlights an environmental education programme that is aimed at developing children’s awareness of their surrounding and promoting their ideas and aspiration for better environment. The programme has been implemented for school children in high-density urban housing in Jakarta, Indonesia, with poor quality of environment and lack of basic services. The approach of the programme is through the children’s inquiry towards their own living environment. Such inquiry becomes the trigger for critical analysis and critical thinking in understanding the criteria for good living environment. Creative ideas and actions are encouraged through design exercise, which becomes the accumulation of children’s inquiry and knowledge formation throughout the process. This paper discusses the educational values of the programme, by looking into various ideas generated by the children and various knowledge they acquired during the process. It also discusses the role of local housing environment as an important setting for learning.  The paper concludes with the important role of the programme in developing children’s capabilities to become the future agent of change for better environment.

Paramita Atmodiwirjo and Yandi Andri Yatmo PowerPoint

Paramita Atmodiwirjo and Yandi Andri Yatmo Paper

 

Day 2 – Session 11:

 

3.00pm – 3.20pm

How To Build a Community School : A Principal’s Journey To Opening A New School In Contemporary Outback Australia

Adam Voigt

Director, Adam Voigt Education Solutions, Australia

Abstract

Principals and School Leaders often feel under increasing pressure in contemporary society to meet expectations placed from multiple sources.  The challenge then is to not only have the knowledge base required to run and manage a school effectively, but to have the intuition, along with the courage to follow it, to make determinations about what is truly important.  Not only will today’s learners need to be literate and numerate, but they will also be required to be collaborative and creative to be successful, to be contributors and to develop fully themselves.  It is this development of the holistic individual that became the moral imperative of our school – to build self-determined and learning enthused young people.  Our broad aim became not only to play a key role in edu-neering young people with skills and capabilities, but also for them to be equipped with creative minds, co-operative intentions and internal compasses about right and wrong.  My recent working experience was as inaugural Principal of an urban school in the Northern Territory of Australia.  While I was afforded wonderful opportunity to autonomously determine school foci, this also arrived with enormous responsibility both within the Government system and my school community.   Through the development of a leading and learning model that was unique to our circumstances and the use of connected metaphors to explain practice and decision-making, I set about the lofty goal of establishing the best community school in the Northern Territory within 12 months.  A relational framework was used to embed practice and strategic planning was directly connected to a shared mission and unpacked through action plans that targeted classrooms, teacher practice, student learning and community wellbeing.  The outcome, one year beyond opening, is highly collegiate, dynamic and self-determining staff with a focus on co-teaching, co-operative learning and evidence based practice.

Adam Voigt PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 12:

3.20pm – 3.40pm

Students’ Perception on the Use of Facebook in a Literature Class

Thelma Victoriano Villaflores

Abstract

Statistics shows that millions of people use facebook.  Most people use it to connect with other people; some use it for fun and entertainment and others use it for business.  The use of facebook has truly exceeded its original purpose of simply connecting people.  It has even spread across the academe.  This action research sought to find out how the students feel about using facebook in their literature class and how it affects their performance in class.  The study used pretest and posttest attitude survey questionnaire which were administered to 87 students who were enrolled in the course.  The students rated the statements using a Likert Scale  and the data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Thelma Victoriano Villaflores PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 13:

3.40pm – 4.00pm

Impact of recession on buying behavior of Indian Consumers

Anurag Shrivastava, & Dr.Pradip Manjrekar

Padmashree Dr.D.Y.Patil University, Mumbai, India

 

Abstract

The paper focuses on the impact of recession on the buying behavior of consumers during recessionary times. The study was conducted on a sample of 50 retailers in Navi Mumbai. The data was subsequently analyzed and the results that came out were in accordance with what was expected by the researcher. The results indicated that Hypermarkets, supermarkets witness a greater change in shopping behavior than the Kirana stores. They were also suggestive of the fact that the type of retail format would adversely affect the footfall of consumers for luxury items. The authors were also ascertained that the customers who shop frequently are more likely to respond to discounts vis-à-vis others. The findings recorded showed that the customers who shop frequently are more likely to spend a higher amount for shopping. It was also revealed that customers who shop more frequently are likely to witness higher fluctuations for luxury items than for regular items. It  indicates, therefore  that  shopping for luxury items  faces  more  fluctuations than   regular  shopping items, which indicates  that customers shopping for  luxury  items may be postponed in times of recession but they continue to shop for regular items.

Anurag Shrivastava and Pradip Manjrekar PowerPoint

 

Day 2 – Session 14:

4.00pm – 4.20pm

The relationship between pre-service teacher’s perceptions towards active learning in Statistic 2 course and their academic achievement

Vanny Septia Efendi

Bachelor Education Student, Sampoerna School of Education, Jakarta, Indonesia

Abstract

The learning method has been long recognized as an indicator of students’ academic achievement in learning process (Silver, Smith, & Nelson, 1995 in Young 2003; Duze, 2010; Oludipe, 2010; Kose 2010). In teacher education, learning method, such as active learning, is also implemented to educate pre-service teacher in using active learning for their students in the future. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between pre-service teachers’ perception toward active learning in Statistic 2 course and their academic achievement in Sampoerna School of Education (SSE). The study was conducted on 43 pre-service teachers in SSE 2009 cohort majoring Mathematics Education who have participated in 16 week long studies of Statistics 2 course. The data was collected using questionnaire to measure the scale of perception on active learning in Statistics 2 course. Data obtained from the questionnaire was correlated to exam result to measure students’ academic achievement. Hypothesis testing is done using bivariate correlation, to measure the relationships between pre-service teachers’ perception and their achievement. Based on data analysis performed, it is found that the correlation coefficient r 0.445 to 0.000 significance (p <0.01). This means that pre-service teacher’ perception toward active learning had a significant correlation with students’ academic achievement. It was claimed that the more positive perception of active learning in Statistics 2 course, the higher score students could achieve. Furthermore, the result gave a strong evidence of the usefulness of active learning to mathematics pre-service teacher in SSE and also for the following Statistics 2 course.

Vanny Septia Efendi PowerPoint

Vanny Septia Efendi Paper

 

Day 2 – Session 15:

4.20pm – 4.40pm

Online Rubric Assessment Tool for Marine Engineering Course

C.S.Chin, Ivan C.K.Tam

School of Marine Science and Technology, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Abstract

Assessing marine engineering course becomes more challenging as differences arise from the gap in experience and skill among staff and students who have a different background in mechanical, electrical, naval architecture, marine and offshore engineering.  However, the challenges can be successfully overcome through careful and thoughtful planning, using feedback on assessment. It allows the students to be involved throughout the assessment process through self-assessment. Besides, the rubric assessment impacts students’ holistic development as it provides feedback to students, and importantly it encourages bilateral communication between the students and lecturer.  This paper covers the proposed works of applying an online rubric form at Newcastle University.

C S Chin and Ivan C K Tam PowerPoint

C S Chin and Ivan C K Tam Paper

 

Day 2 – Session 16:

4.40pm – 5.00pm

Presentation from staff of Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools Centre of Excellence, Republic of Kazakhstan

Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools Kazakhstan PowerPoint

 

 

5.00pm

 Official closing by Chairperson