ICOLACE 4, 2016

PROCEEDINGS

4rd International Conference On Learning And

Community Enrichment

 Hotel Jen Tanglin, Singapore

 Sunday 23 October – Wednesday 26

October 2016

ISBN 978-0-9872206-3-9

PROGRAM

SUMMARY

Sunday 23 October

6.00pm – 7.00pm        Registration in Temasek 4 function room,

level 2, at Hotel Jen Tanglin,  1A Cuscaden Road, Singapore.

Please ask at hotel reception for directions.

Monday 24 October

9.30am – 10.20am Late registration
10.20am Assemble in conference room and preliminary notices

regarding conference

10.30am Official opening ICOLACE 2014
10.35am Presentation by students from Canadian International

School, Singapore regarding local student involvement in

sustainable development activities and lifewide learning

11.00am Morning tea
11.25am Return to conference room
11.30am Introductory comments by Chairman
11.45am Keynote address by Professor Norman Jackson
12.30pm – 2.30pm Workshop luncheon to discuss morning topics and document

feedback

2.30pm – 4.30pm Presentations by Conference delegates
4.30pm Afternoon tea
4.40pm – 5.30pm Annual General Meeting of International Association for

Lifewide Learning


Tuesday, 25 October
9.45am Assemble in main foyer of Hotel Jen Tanglin for visit to

OLGC School to meet with Principal and Senior Staff to discuss

Goals Action Plan (GAP) framework used by school to encourage

student lifewide learning

10.00am Depart for visit to OLGC School
1.00pm Arrive back at Hotel Jen Tanglin from school visit
1.00pm –- 2.30pm Workshop luncheon to discuss morning visit and document

feedback

2.30pm – 4.30pm Presentations by conference delegates
4.30pm Close of conference and afternoon tea

Wednesday, 26 Oct: Optional visit to local

school to view student projects

9.45am            Assemble with Chairperson in Traders Hotel

foyer for 10am departure

PROGRAM

DETAIL

Day 1:  Monday 24

October

10.30am – 10.35am

Official Welcome and Opening of ICOLACE 2016

10.35am – 11.00am

Presentation regarding involvement by young people in

local community projects, Singapore by students from Canadian

International School.

Coordinator Mrs Marie Wong

11.00am – 11.30am Morning Tea

11.30am – 11.45am

Introductory comments by Chairman

Chris Picone, Senior Manager, Office of the Dean,

Australian College of Kuwait

Kuwait

11.45am – 12.30pm

Keynote address “Exploring the idea of learning

ecologies, it’s value and use in understanding students’

lifewide learning, development and achievement”

Professor Norman Jackson, Founder Lifewide Education and

Creative Academy

United Kingdom

12.30pm – 2.30pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics

and document feedback

2.30pm – 3.00pm

Silid Aralan Learning Technology Education (SALTEd): A

Framework to Empower Low-Performing Learners to be Social

Innovators

Arcie Mallari, Founder/Executive Director, Silid

Aralan

Philippines

3.00pm – 3.30pm

Services provided by Positive Intentions Organisation

in Singapore regarding Corporate Social Responsibility and

Service Learning

Ivan Chin, Partner, Positive Intentions

Singapore

3.30pm – 4.00pm

Engaging with Special Needs in Architectural

Education

Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Senior Lecturer, Universitas

Indonesia

Indonesia

4.00pam – 4.30pm

New Dimensions of Promoting Social Responsibility in

Higher Education Institutions through Community Work that

Nurtures the Holistic Formation of Students

Samina Chaudhry, Deputy Director Quality Assurance, Bahria

University, Islamabad

Pakistan

4.30pm – 4.40pm Afternoon tea

4.40pm – 5.30pm

Annual General Meeting for International

Association for Lifewide Learning (IAFLL)

Chaired by Chris Picone

Day 2:  Tuesday 25

October

9.45am – 10.00am

Assemble in main foyer of Hotel Jen Tanglin for

transport to OLGC School to meet with Principal and Senior

Staff to discuss Goals Action Plan (GAP) framework used by

school to encourage student lifewide learning

 

10.00am sharp

Depart Hotel Jen Tanglin for visit to OLGC School, 2C

Burghley Drive Singapore 558979

Telephone: 62886930

Principal Mrs Catherine Seah

Singapore

12.30pm –

Return to Hotel Jen Tanglin from OLGC School

1.00pm – 2.30pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning visit and

document feedback

2.30pm – 3.00pm

Evolving Ecosystems for Encouraging, Supporting and

Recognising the Lifewide Formation of Students’ in the UK

Higher Education System

Professor Norman Jackson, Founder Lifewide Education and

Creative Academy

United Kingdom

3.00pm – 3.30pm

Presentation with regard to Education for

Sustainable Development and Student Lifewide Learning in

Nepal

Deepak Bastola, Director- Program, SAURYA International

Higher Education School

Nepal

3.30pm – 4.30pm

Workshop on use of Goals Action Plan (GAP) Template

as a framework to nurture students towards lifewide goal

setting and review of progress.  Model currently in use at OLGC

School Singapore and at Australian College of Kuwait in

Kuwait

Chris Picone, Senior Manager Office of the Dean, Australian

College of Kuwait

Kuwait

4.30pm

Close of conference followed by afternoon

tea

Chris Picone, Chairperson

Day 3:  Wednesday 26

October

 

10.00am – 1.00pm

Optional visit to local school to view student project work

towards sustainable development.  (Interested delegates to meet

Chairperson in foyer of Traders Hotel at 9.45am)

PROCEEDINGS

Day 1:  Monday 24

October

10.30am – 10.35am

Official Welcome and Opening of ICOLACE 2016

Chris Picone, Chairperson


10.35am – 11.00am

Presentation regarding involvement by young people in local community projects, Singapore by students from Canadian International School.

Coordinator Mrs Marie Wong from World Wildlife Fund, Singapore

Attachment 1A Canadian International School PowerPoint


11.00am – 11.30am Morning Tea


11.30am – 11.45am

Introductory comments by Chairman

Chris Picone, Senior Manager, Office of the Dean, Australian College of Kuwait

Kuwait


11.45am – 12.30pm

Keynote address “Exploring the idea of learning ecologies, it’s value and use in understanding students’ lifewide learning, development and achievement”

Professor Norman Jackson, Founder Lifewide Education and Creative Academy, United Kingdom

Abstract

Eduard Lindeman writing 90 years ago said, ‘the whole of life is learning therefore education can have no ending’.  The whole of our life involves the diverse physical, social, virtual, intellectual and psychological spaces, contexts and cultures in which we learn, develop and achieve.  Our life involves the whole of us in a complex, ever unfolding interactive relationship with the diverse physical, social, virtual, intellectual and psychological spaces, contexts and cultures in which we learn, develop and achieve. This perpetual interactive relationship between the whole of us, our whole life and all the environments, contexts and situations we inhabit can be holistically represented as an  ecological relationship. The ecological perspective on learning enables us to connect the formal with the informal and non-formal learning contexts. It provides us with the means to see the lifewide dimension of learning as being fundamentally an ecological process involving the learner interacting with different environments in their life, in different ways, at different times for different purposes. An ecological perspective on a student’s higher education learning experiences captures their uniqueness in engaging with the affordances in their life: affordances that sometimes only they can see and act upon. An ecological perspective honours a student’s uniqueness in a way that a degree classification, transcript or even a comprehensive Higher Education Record of Achievement cannot.

The purpose of my talk is to introduce the idea of learning ecologies and explore the proposition that people  individually and collectively build ecologies that embrace all these dimensions of life, in order to learn, develop and achieve the things they value. I want to explore what this might mean for educational institutions that embrace a lifewide concept of student formation.

Attachment 2A Professor Norman Jackson Keynote Session 1 PowerPoint


12.30pm – 2.30pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback


2.30pm – 3.00pm

Silid Aralan Learning Technology Education (SALTEd): A Framework to Empower Low-Performing Learners to be Social Innovators

Arcie Mallari, Founder/Executive Director, Silid Aralan, Philippines

Attachment 3A Silid Aralan Learning Technology Education PowerPoint


3.00pm – 3.30pm

Services provided by Positive Intentions Organisation in Singapore regarding Corporate Social  Responsibility and Service Learning

Ivan Chin, Partner, Positive Intentions, Singapore

Attachment 4A Positive Intentions PowerPoint


3.30pm – 4.00pm

Engaging with Special Needs in Architectural Education

Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Senior Lecturer, Universitas, Indonesia, Indonesia

Attachment 5A Engaging with Special Needs PowerPoint


4.00pam – 4.30pm

New Dimensions of Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education Institutions through Community Work that Nurtures the Holistic Formation of Students

Samina Chaudhry, Deputy Director Quality Assurance, Bahria University, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract

The actual growth of human beings not only involves economic growth, but also there must be a sense of empowerment, achievement, satisfaction and inner fulfilment in life. Each individual finds identity, meaning and purpose in life through links to the community, the world at large and in humanitarian values. These elements will ensure that cultural norms and human values remain dominant in the world. This can only be achieved through establishing a social outwork that places human worth right at the top rather than power and control; this requires the genuine empowerment of the individual. The pressures associated with the modern age have also led to a concern that Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) of Pakistan, which is a developing country having a rich and strong value system, are lagging behind in their obligation to equip their students/ graduates with the ethical and moral values through community services that forms the basis of social responsibility in the complex relationship between corporate institutions, both public and private, and society at large. This study will help the mentors in nurturing the holistic formation of a student that encompasses and integrates lifetime observations, manifold layers of skills and experience rather than narrowly outlining human potential.

The emphasis of this study will be on the overall grooming of students not only through books but also through social work, community based projects etc. Studies conducted on the student’s community participation, taking up the responsibility of their own projects etc, will bring out new dimensions of community work. It will also assess the level of commitment to community work, elements of social responsibility in their curricula and their relationship to teaching.

This study interprets rationales that the community as a whole is involved in and contributes to the life wide learning of humans. This leads to an understanding of the relation between motivations and undertaking of community work along with ethical and economic dimensions, and its impact on the life of an individual. It shall also examine as to how the HEIs can modify their curriculum of teaching and training in community service to their students, so as to groom them in becoming responsible member of the community.

Attachment 6A Social Responsibility PowerPoint


4.30pm – 4.40pm Afternoon tea


4.40pm – 5.30pm

Annual General Meeting for International Association for Lifewide Learning (IAFLL)

Chaired by Chris Picone

Attachment 7A IAFLL AGM Minutes


Day 2:  Tuesday 25 October

10.00am

Visit to OLGC School, 2C Burghley Drive Singapore for presentation by staff and students regarding experiences using the Goals Action Plan (GAP) model for personal development

Principal Mrs Catherine Seah, Singapore

Attachment 8A  OLGC Goals Action Plan GAP PowerPoint


12.30pm – Return to Hotel Jen Tanglin from OLGC School


1.00pm – 2.30pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning visit and document feedback


2.30pm – 3.00pm

Evolving Ecosystems for Encouraging, Supporting and Recognising the Lifewide Formation of Students’ in the UK Higher Education System

Professor Norman Jackson, Founder Lifewide Education and Creative Academy, United Kingdom

Abstract

This is the second of two presentations aimed at developing an ecological perspective on higher education as a means to gaining a deeper understanding of the lifewide formation of students and how it might be encouraged, supported and recognised by universities and colleges. Using the ecological systems framework developed by Urie Bronfenbrenner (Bronfenbrenner 1999) to view UK higher education as an ecosystem – more accurately a constellation of evolving institutional ecosocial systems. The higher education ecosystem as a whole, and the institutional systems within it, change over time, and we can illustrate this by showing how the English higher education ecosystem is evolving to encourage, support and recognise students’ lifewide development. We can use this vision to predict how the current higher education ecosystem might evolve in ways that would be even more supportive of lifewide education.

Every higher education institution creates its own unique  organisational ecosystem and consequently the characteristics of  institutional schemes to encourage, support and recognise students lifewide development, are diverse.  Variations occur in (Betts and Jackson 2011): their purpose and focus; the qualities and attributes they choose to encourage and recognise, expectations in the level of student commitment (time and effort involved) in order to achieve an award; their inclusion criteria – who is included or not included; scale and level of participation within the student population; whether students opt in or opt out of the scheme; the types of experiences that qualify for the award – some are more limited than others; whether the focus is co-curriculum, extra-curriculum or a  combination; whether there are specialist routes or pathways; whether there are different levels of performance; how they are assessed, by whom and the methods and criteria used; how learning is demonstrated – the extent to which critical reflection is encouraged or valued; forms of recognition: points, academic or general credit, certificates, badges, awards; how they are organised and who organises and coordinates them; how they are resourced and who is responsible for managing the scheme; types of staff involved – academic staff, personal tutors, central service staff; level and types of employer involvement – including sponsorships and endorsements; extent to which the scheme is an explicit part of the university’s concept of the student experience how schemes are presented and marketed to students; how awards are made on completion; whether such awards feature in transcripts; the degree to which the institution’s Students’ Union is involved; the degree to which devolved customisation is permitted within a scheme; extent to which awards are connected to an institution’s student achievement transcripts and/or Higher Education Achievement

Report (HEAR)

There is strength in such diversity in so far as the ownership is concerned and the fact that each scheme can be tailor made to align with institutional needs and strategic goals. Furthermore, as new approaches are devised, implemented and evaluated, what has been leant can be shared with the wider ecosystem. In this way the whole higher education ecosystem learns and evolved. But such diversity of approaches also makes it more challenging to share understandings and practices between institutional schemes, because different schemes are trying to fulfill different purposes and support different things. Institutional schemes to support and recognise students’ lifewide development appear to be framed in one of three main orientations according to whether the approach emphasises: 1) whole-person development 2) development for employability or 3) leadership qualities.

Schemes are usually underpinned bystatements of attributes – qualities, skills, capabilities, values and dispositions that are deemed to be appropriate and relevant which act as prompts for reflection, evidence gathering and the evaluation of achievement and fulfilment of requirements.

A selection of schemes will be used to illustrate some of the approaches being used in UK HE to encourage, support and recognise students’ lifewide development.

Attachment 9A Evolving Ecosytems Paper


3.00pm – 3.30pm

Presentation with regard to Education for Sustainable Development and Student Lifewide Learning in Nepal

Mohammad Sabbir Mansoor, Creative Self Enhancement Project,

Program Manager, SAURYA International Higher Education School, Nepal

Attachment 10A PABSON Creative Self Enhancement PowerPoint


3.30pm – 4.30pm

Workshop on use of Goals Action Plan (GAP) Template as a framework to nurture students towards lifewide goal setting and review of progress.  Model currently in use at OLGC

School Singapore and at Australian College of Kuwait in Kuwait

Chris Picone, Senior Manager Office of the Dean, Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait

Attachment 11A ACK GAP PowerPoint


4.30pm

Close of conference followed by afternoon tea

Chris Picone, Chairperson