ICOLACE 2014

3rd International Conference On Learning And Community Enrichment

 Traders Hotel, Singapore

 Sunday 22 June – Wednesday 25 June 2014

 

PROCEEDINGS

from the 3rd International Conference

On Learning And Community Enrichment

(ICOLACE)

Traders Hotel, 1A Cuscaden Street, Singapore

22-25 June 2014

ISBN 978-0-9872206-2-2

 

PROGRAM SUMMARY

Sunday 22 June

5.00pm – 7.00pm         Registration at Traders Hotel, Temasek Function Room, Level 2, 1A Cuscaden Road, Singapore.  Please ask at hotel reception for directions.

 

Monday 23 June

8.45am – 9.45am         Late registration

9.45am                        Assemble in conference room and preliminary notices regarding conference

10.00am                      Official opening ICOLACE 2014

10.30am                      Presentation by teachers and students from Our Lady of Good Counsel School, Singapore about local student involvement in lifewide learning

11.00am                      Morning tea

11.25am                      Return to conference room

11.30am                      Presentations by Conference delegates (refer page 2)

1.10pm                        Morning wrap-up

1.15pm – 2.45             Workshop luncheon to discuss morning topics and document feedback

2.45pm – 5.35pm        Presentations by Conference delegates (refer pages 2/3)

 

Tuesday, 24 June

9.45am                        Assemble in conference room and notices for Day 2

9.55am                        Welcome to Day 2 by Conference Chairperson

10.00am                      Presentations by Conference delegates (refer page 4)

11.00am                      Morning tea and poster display

11.15am                      Depart for visit to OLGC School to meet with teachers and students

1.15pm                        Arrive back at Traders Hotel for lunch

1.15pm – 2.45pm        Workshop luncheon to discuss morning topics and document feedback

2.45pm – 5.00pm        Presentations by conference delegates (refer page 4) and conference close

Wednesday, 25 June: optional visit to local schools to view local student projects

This event has now been scheduled for Tuesday 24 June departing Traders Hotel at 11.15am and returning at 1.15pm.

 

PROGRAM DETAIL

 Day 1:  Monday 23 June

10.00am – 10.30am

Official Welcome and Opening of ICOLACE 2014

10.30am – 11.00am

Presentation regarding involvement by students in local community projects, Singapore by students and teachers from Our Lady of Good Counsel School (OLGC)

Teacher: Ms Theresa Ng

Students: Estelle and Rhea (Primary 4 Integrity Class)

11.00am – 11.30am (Morning Tea)

11.30am – 11.55am

Learning from Problems, Failures, and Unexpected Ideas:  A Reflection on Real Life Learning Experience Through Community-based Projects

Yandi Andri Yatmo, Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Verarisa Anastasia Ujung, Tajrinaa Istiani

Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

 

11.55am – 12.20pm

Teacher Educator to K-12 Educator to K-12 Student: Strategies to ignite a passion for holistic approach to learning among prospective educators to help them feel confident to promote a life-wide well-being of their prospective students

Kiran Padmaraju and Linda Sherwood, Eastern Illinois University, United States of America

 

12.20pm – 12.45pm

Shakespeare Reading Club: Introducing Shakespearean Drama to Children

Wing Bo (Anna) Tso, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

12.45pm – 1.10pm

A snapshot of the development of generic learning outcomes: Implications to New Senior Secondary (NSS) school reform in Hong Kong

Sammy King-fai Hui, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong

1.10pm – 1.15pm

Morning summary by Chairperson

1.15pm – 2.45pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback

2.45pm – 3.10pm

Teacher Leadership Development in schools: a factor towards students’ lifewide formation

Daisy Anajemba, Los Angeles Unified School District, United States of America


3.10pm – 3.35pm

The Robot Competition: a project-based learning approach for enhancing STEM education

Yi-Ching (Sophia) Chen. National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

 

3.35pm – 4.00pm

Obstacles in Growth of Learning English Communication Skills for Arab Students: An Investigative Study at Samtha College, Jazan University(KSA)

Abha Singh, Jazan University, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 

 

4.00pm – 4.15pm Afternoon tea

 

 4.15pm – 4.40pm

Measuring students’ perceptions of the educational environment of a new pharmacy school using the DREEM questionnaire

Pei Nee (Penny) Wong, Taylor’s University, Malaysia

4.40pm – 5.00pm

Noduts and Draguates

Chris and Christine Picone, Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait

 

5.00pm – 5.30pm

Lifewide PROGRESS Reports as a framework to nurture self-management by students of setting goals and reviewing progress.  Workshop led by

Chris Picone, Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait

 

 

5.30pm – 5.35pm Concluding comments from Day 1 by Chairperson

 

 

Day 2:  Tuesday 24 June

10.00am – 11.00am

Transforming Low Performing Students to High Performing Community Leaders.

Workshop led by:

Arcie Mallari, Silid Aralan, Philippines

11.00am – 11.15am Morning tea

11.15am – 1.15pm

Optional visit to local schools to view student project work towards sustainable development.

Interested delegates to meet Chairperson in foyer of Traders Hotel at 11.15am.

 

1.15pm – 2.45pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback

2.45pm – 3.10pm

Children as “Interior Architects”: Creative Learning and exploring of classroom furniture.

Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Noor Fajrina F. Istiani, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

 

3.10pm – 3.35pm

Reinforcing notions of duty and rights

Geetanee Napal, University of Mauritius, Mauritius

 

3.35pm – 3.50pm Afternoon tea

 

3.50pm – 4.50pm

Discussion session towards establishment of International Association for Lifewide Learning (IAFLL) as formal structure for

  • networking by educators engaged in lifewide educational research and programs and as
  • umbrella organization for convening future ICOLACE conferences.

 

4.50pm

Official close of conference by Chairperson 

 

PROCEEDINGS

 

Day 1 – Session 1:

10.30am – 11.00am

Presentation regarding involvement by students in local community projects, Singapore by students and teachers from Our Lady of Good Counsel School (OLGC)

Teacher: Ms Theresa Ng

Students: Estelle and Rhea (Primary 4 Integrity Class)

OLGC Green Program PowerPoint

Day 1 – Session 2:

11.30am – 11.55am

Learning from Problems, Failures, and Unexpected Ideas:  A Reflection on Real Life Learning Experience Through Community-based Projects

Yandi Andri Yatmo, Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Verarisa Anastasia Ujung

Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia,, Indonesia

 

Abstract

At the heart of any lifelong learning is the learning itself. In the pursuit of the knowledge learning, the potential of the community-based project suggests the interdependence between educators, students and community. Students as the learner take responsibility of their own project. Meanwhile, the whole community involves and contributes to the lifelong and lifewide learning efforts. Partnership between students, educators, and community improve the performance and build the enthusiasm to the development of the lifelong learner’s whole personality to be ready for any possible circumstances.

 This paper presents several cases of community-based projects that students have practiced at Department of Architecture, Universitas Indonesia in the Everyday and Architecture class. The objective of this community-based project is to expose the students with real life architecture intervention and experience of participatory design approach. The students found various underlying lessons in this community-based project which promote the collaboration between the students’ ideas and the community aspiration. They found the genuine layer of community culture, how to communicate and negotiate with the community. They learned not to discredit failures, but to learn that failures are an inherent part of the process. They discovered the layers of “unexpected ideas” within the learning process and learned how these ideas can be applied as method and further references. They learned to address the problems in different ways. They did appreciate the problems and were taking steps and appropriate manners to respond and adapt to it. The whole learning process promoted the role of the students not only as experts in their field but to be more sensitive with various everyday issues in the community.

Yatmo Atmodiwirjo and Ujung PowerPoint

Yatmo Atmodiwirjo and Ujung Paper

 

Day 1 – Session 3:

11.55am – 12.20pm

Teacher Educator to K-12 Educator to K-12 Student: Strategies to ignite a passion for holistic approach to learning among prospective educators to help them feel confident to promote a life-wide well-being of their prospective students

Kiran Padmaraju and Linda Sherwood, Eastern Illinois University, United States of America

 

Abstract:     

This presentation is related to the theme of the conference very closely as the presenters who have been K-12 teachers (collectively for more than 40 years) and then teacher educators (collectively for more than 20 years) will share their perspectives and strategies for promoting holistic learning.

Being long time classroom teachers and then teacher educators, both the presenters share the philosophy that it is crucial to ignite the passion among prospective teachers to look at their students beyond their academic capabilities. Both of them feel the urgent need in today’s world for educators to be much more than mere academic coaches. They feel that educators have a huge role in ensuring that their students will become truly global citizens who will participate in their local and global communities to promote the well-being of humanity. While there has been a tremendous increase in opportunity for all due to technological advances, there have also been scientific advancements that can be put to terrible use to harm the humankind.

Other than the caregivers for children, the educators they have, spend a considerable amount of time and effort shaping the thinking processes and the values that children develop as they grow older.  It is therefore essential that educators take this responsibility seriously and act accordingly to look at the holistic well-being of their students. As science continues to expand our understanding of the connections between emotional intelligence and cognitive skills, it is truly becoming apparent that educators need to be fully aware of this connection and provide learning opportunities for their students to instill in them a sense of responsibility towards the well-being of humanity.

Kiran Padmaraju and Linda Sherwood PowerPoint

 

Day 1 – Session 4:

12.20pm – 12.45pm

Shakespeare Reading Club: Introducing Shakespearean Drama to Children

Wing Bo (Anna) Tso, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Abstract:

Teaching Shakespeare to children can be one of the most challenging tasks for English teachers and parents. Because of the difficult vocabulary and unusual language, Shakespearean plays are often left unread and unexplored in school and beyond classroom. With a view to helping children overcome reading obstacles and learn to appreciate Shakespeare and his works, in March 2013, I conducted a weekly Shakespeare reading club for the Hong Kong Public Libraries. Two comedies and two tragedies, namely Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth, were introduced to about twenty participants who had no experience reading or studying Shakespeare’s works.

Since the reading club was tailor-made for young readers ranging from ages ten to twelve, rather than employing the traditional approach to study literary classics, I used various learner-centred, unconventional and interactive ways of introducing Shakespeare. For instance, instead of using the original texts which many young readers find ‘threatening’, we used colourful illustrations and cartoon video clips (the BBC versions in modern English) to stimulate participants’ interest in exploring the plot, characters, famous quotes and language of the plays. Furthermore, to help children acquire key life skills such as art appreciation, creativity, critical thinking and effective communication, the reading club included the reader’s theatre, movie screenings, creative writing tasks, mini-drama performances, as well as other group activities.

In this paper, I will share teaching ideas and techniques that make Shakespearean drama an enjoyable platform for promoting life-wide learning.

 

Wing Bo Anna Tso PowerPoint

Wing Bo Anna Tso Paper

 

Day 1 – Session 5:

12.45pm – 1.10pm

A snapshot of the development of generic learning outcomes: Implications to New Senior Secondary (NSS) school reform in Hong Kong

Sammy King-fai Hui, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong

Abstract

Hong Kong is moving towards a knowledge-based economy.  To nurture a population to continuously support and drive its development to achieve a world-class success, Hong Kong’s education system has been reformed tremendously since 1997 with a balanced focus of academic and practical learning.  Generic form of learning outcomes are critical outcomes for students to demonstrate high flexibility and adaptability in respond to the future ever-changing challenges.

Using instruments that measure “cultural literacy” (Hui, 2012) and “student engagement” (Hui & Cheung, forthcoming), this study sets out the agenda to assess the development of generic learning outcomes of Hong Kong senior secondary school students, the extent to which they are well equipped with the skills to prepare themselves for a knowledge-based economy.  Results of a survey study of 1,715 students inferred not up-to-standard performance and which questioned the design of the New Senior Secondary (NSS) school curriculum, the core subject of Liberal Studies and the Applied Learning courses in particular.  Regression model further suggested generic learning outcomes could be explained largely by how schools plan and facilitate students’ learning inside and outside the classroom.

It is the primary role of NSS schools to provide students with meaningful and useful learning experiences to achieve the curriculum goal of fostering generic learning.  This paper will contribute to the discussion of how to support more NSS school reform in Hong Kong.

 King Fai Sammy Hui PowerPoint

1.10pm – 1.15pm

Morning summary by Chairperson

1.15pm – 2.45pm: Workshop Luncheon to review morning topics and document feedback

 

Day 1 – Session 6:

2.45pm – 3.10pm

Teacher Leadership Development in schools: a factor towards students’ lifewide formation

Daisy Anajemba, Los Angeles Unified School District, United States of America

 

Abstract

Lifewide learning implies new levels of leadership roles and therefore leadership skills for educators, particularly teachers. The focal point of teacher leadership is to challenge the mental model of teachers about their work and to equip them with the skills and knowledge to become more effective. The ability of teachers to influence students to become critical thinkers and problem solvers by exposing them to diverse meaningful and transformational experiences therefore implies lifewide learning and makes a connection with leadership. Edlin’s five keys to achieving this: creating felt need, establishing empathetic and constructive relationships with the learners, using constructive teaching strategies, tapping into core values, and providing extrinsic incentives is particularly relevant.

Schools directed toward the emerging definition of teacher leadership, the emerging roles of teacher leaders, the rationale for teacher leadership, and the benefits of teacher leadership will have an advantage over those that are not, in providing students with lifewide learning. The implication is that all schools should engage in a deliberate effort toward teacher leadership development in order to enable them effectively prepare students for their future lives.

Servant leadership, purpose-driven work life, value for professional growth, and community building are identified as overarching themes that enhance the development of teacher leadership. The conference presentation will supply information regarding these practices, as well as factors that impede teacher leadership development in schools.

Daisy Anajemba PowerPoint

Daisy Anajemba Paper

 

Day 1 – Session 7:

3.10pam – 3.35pm

The Robot Competition: a project-based learning approach for enhancing STEM education

Yi-Ching (Sophia) Chen. National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

 Abstract

Robotics has become more visible in K-12 schools. The objective of robot competitions is to inspire and help sustain an early interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) field. Robot competitions is a way to engage students in hands-on and project-based learning that can motivate students’ interested topics and provide a vehicle for model teaching.

The purpose of the study is to survey the participants of the robot competition Taipei Robot Cup (TRC). 181 responded surveys were collected and the return rate is 80%. Participants were asked about their opinions on why they participated in the competition, what they’ve gained in their personal lives after participating the competitions as well as positive and negative effects of their experiences.

The results are as the following: 1. the robot competition offers a creative and effective method of acquiring introductory pre-engineering knowledge. 2. The robot technology popularizes robot-related knowledge and strengthens a set of basic skills that would be useful for the future professional lives of the participants. 3. Competitions generate more efficiency and stimulate interests in STEM and robotics research.

The findings of this study may have the potential for helping educators rethink the idea and organization of robot competitions, outreach activities, thus inspiring the emergence of more interests in STEM.

Yi Ching Sophia Chen PowerPoint

Yi Ching Sophia Chen Paper

 

Day 1 – Session 8:

3.35pm – 4.00pm

Obstacles in Growth of Learning English Communication Skills for Arab Students: An Investigative Study at Samtha College,  Jazan University(KSA)

Abha Singh, Jazan University, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 

Abstract

English has been taught in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as a foreign language. This makes it hard for the students to understand the target language and achieve more with it. Saudi Arabia is considered as a developing country. The syllabi mostly focus on the writing rather than speaking drills. The use of methodologies and approaches in teaching is still traditional using the board and the tape-recorder.

The research paper primarily focuses on obstacle in growth of learning English communication skills for Arabic speakers. Consequently, it would also exist on the problems that they usually encounter in the process of learning English as a foreign language, including all the challenges they typically deal with like problems in grammar, pronunciation, syntaxes, tenses, prepositions and others. The sample of study is based on questionnaire for students and teachers and informal interviews of both, at Samtha College in Jazan University. The sample of study was selected randomly from level four to level eight.

The study reveals that the students’ language has gradually improved, but the pace of growth is rather slow. The students’ proficiency in English language is moderate.

Abha Singh PowerPoint

Abha Singh Paper

 

4.00pm – 4.15pm Afternoon tea

 

Day 1 – Session 9:

4.15pm – 4.40pm

Measuring students’ perceptions of the educational environment of a new pharmacy school using the DREEM questionnaire

Pei Nee (Penny) Wong, Taylor’s University, Malaysia

Abstract

In 2010 Taylor’s University (TU), Malaysia, started a collaborative pharmacy programme with Cardiff University, UK. To determine students’ experiences of the educational environment at Taylor’s, a modified version of the DREEM1 (Dundee Ready Education Environment) questionnaire was used. DREEM has been used to produce readings and diagnostic analyses of undergraduate educational environments in international medical and other health professional degrees. DREEM underwent very minor modifications so it was appropriate for the pharmacy context, e.g. ‘medicine’ replaced with ‘pharmacy’.

 Approval was obtained from the university ethics committee. The modified DREEM was administered on paper at the start of the academic year to all TU 2nd (n=44) and 3rd (n=20) year pharmacy students in a timetabled teaching session. They were asked about their views relating to the previous academic year. Data were analyzed using SPSS. The response rate was 100%. Overall, year 3 students (Y3) reported a better educational environment in their second year than year 2 students (Y2) relating to their first year (135.22/200 vs. 124.6/200). In subdomain analyses, Y3 viewed the following aspects (sub-domain analysis) of their second year more favorably than Y2 did their first year: significantly higher scores for Y3 for learning (means 33.94 vs. 31.69; p=0.037), teacher (30.83 vs. 25.93; p<0.001) and atmosphere (31.78 vs. 28.43; p=0.014). There was difference for academic self-perceptions.

This study has shown that both cohorts perceived the learning environment positively. Nevertheless, the study revealed some areas of enhancement. These have already been addressed. Future qualitative research could explore the reasons for views.

 Pie Nee Penny Wong PowerPoint

 

Day 1 – Session 10:

4.40pm – 5.00pm

Noduts and Draguates

Chris and Christine Picone, Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait

 

Abstract

A ‘nodut’ is an unformed donut.  It is the result of placing the various ingredients into a bowl and assuming the contents will somehow be converted into a finished product without an accompanying recipe process.

A ‘draguate’ is the result of much the same lack of procedure.  (S)he is an unformed graduate.  ‘Draguates’ occur when communities presume that pouring the various learning ingredients into the student bowl will somehow produce rounded and ready graduates without the need for an effective recipe process.  In such a state, how can young people meaningfully answer the question- what do you want to be when you grow up?

Students need the recipe as well as the learning ingredients for their balanced growth as individuals and as connected community members.  What is the main recipe currently used by schools to aid students in their formation?  From a student perspective, sadly it is the formal study activities that are later reflected in the academic report, which is still seen as the ultimate result required for future success when in reality it largely reflects just one of the four key ingredients for learning identified by the International Commission on Education for the 21st Century.

The academic report remains essential to officially recognise scholastic achievement.  However, some form of supplementary record is needed that formally encourages and acknowledges student development in the wider sense towards their self sufficient and fulfilled futures.  To this end, Lifewide PROGRESS Reports are presented as a simple but structured means to guide students towards ongoing self management of their lifewide learning and formational process.  Accordingly, Lifewide PROGRESS Reports provide a framework for students to answer the biggest question on their minds- “What do I want to be when I grow up?”

 Chris Picone Paper

 Day 1 – Session 11:

5.00pm – 5.30pm

Lifewide PROGRESS Reports as a framework to nurture self-management by students of setting goals and reviewing progress.  Workshop led by

Chris Picone, Australian College of Kuwait, Kuwait

Background

Lifewide PROGRESS (Personal Response of Ongoing Growth Regarding Environment, Employability, Society and Self) Reports are templates to help students document and subsequently record progress towards:

  • their personal lifewide goals (Self), as well as
  • their contribution towards wider sustainable development (Environment, Employability and Society).

Examples of Lifewide PROGRESS Report for primary and secondary students may be viewed at http://www.pecascentres.com/doc/lpr.pdf.  The template is free and schools are welcome to adapt the layout to suit local purposes.

Towards self managed learning and formation

At the end of each term/semester, students sign off their achievements for the current time period and in subsequent terms/semesters the planning and review cycle is repeated.  Lifewide PROGRESS Reports are a student managed complement to the official school report and ideally are included in the same folder at the end of term/semester for presentation to parents.  In so doing, the school formally recognises the increasing role and responsibility that students must develop in the self management of their lifelong and lifewide learning.  If this skill is not successfully nurtured prior to graduation then students are at risk of leaving school underprepared for the wider challenges and uncertainties in their futures.

Trial introduction of template

Since 2010, seven schools/universities in seven countries (Dubai, Kuwait, Pakistan, Singapore, Ghana, Mexico and the Philippines) have participated in a trial introduction of Lifewide PROGRESS Reports.  Feedback to date has been extremely positive.  For instance, Shaheen Raza, Head of Lower Primary at City Schools International Dubai campus, observed that the students were proud of their achievements and that both teachers and parents noticed a tangible improvement in childrens’ attitude and behaviour.

Revision of template

Following the successful trial introduction of the template within the Australian College of Kuwait (ACK), to encourage and recognize student participation it was decided to establish the ACK Award program.  This certificate confirms the goal setting and progress towards achievement by a student over a period of two semesters.  There are four levels of  the Award (Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum) as an incentive for students to continue within the program during their studies at the college.  Participants are allocated a mentor whose role is to meet the student on a monthly basis and to motivate the student towards achievement of personal goals.  The planning sheet used by students is based on the original Lifewide PROGRESS Reports template but is now titled Goals Action Plan (GAP) with permission from Our Lady of Good Counsel School, Singapore.

Workshop

During the workshop, delegates will be given samples of the GAP planning sheet used by students at ACK and also a copy of the ACK Awards policy which clarifies requirements needed to obtain this recognition.  Delegates will then be invited to comment on the model and any changes suggested for adoption in other educational settings.

Chris and Christine Picone PowerPoint

 

5.30pm – 5.35pm Concluding comments from Day 1 by Chairperson

 

Day 2:  Tuesday 24 June

 

Day 2 – Session 12:

10.00am – 11.00am

Transforming Low Performing Students to High Performing Community Leaders.

Workshop led by:

Arcie Mallari, Silid Aralan, Philippines

Arcie Mallari PowerPoint

 

11.00am – 11.15am Morning tea

 

Day 2 – Session 13:

11.15am – 1.15pm

Optional visit to Our Lady of Good Counsel School, Singapore to view student project work towards sustainable development.

 OLGC GAP Program PowerPoint

1.15pm – 2.45pm Workshop luncheon

Day 2 – Session 14:

2.45pm – 3.10pm

Children as “Interior Architects”: Creative Learning and exploration of classroom furniture.

Paramita Atmodiwirjo, Noor Fajrina F. Istiani, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

Abstract

Introducing design knowledge to primary school children could be an effective approach to promote creative learning and to generate children’s creative thinking. It is important for children to become familiar with their own needs and to express how their needs could be accommodated in creative ways especially in their own spaces. Children are the main actors that engage with everyday experience in using the school furniture. School furniture should become learning tools that could support creative learning process and allow the children to express their creativity within the classroom. Therefore, we attempt to involve children to generate the ideas of innovative school furniture that express their ingenious and imaginative ideas through creative approach.

This paper describes a creative workshop in which children took a role as “interior architects”. The purpose of the workshop was to identify and introduce various possibilities in using classroom furniture, in particular the individual desks and communal shelves. The furniture workshop was developed for fourth grade primary school children in Depok, Indonesia. The children were asked to identify their needs of various items which they use in everyday activities in the classroom. They were also encouraged to recognize the position of their stuffs. Then, they imagined the ideas about various suitable containers to keep their belongings, which could be boxes, racks, hangers, or drawers.

This simple design exercise became an opportunity for children to gain skills and knowledge on observing, analyzing, imagining, and presenting. The ideas of the students were presented through creative collages, which clearly illustrated their knowledge and creative exploration. This workshop became a medium to enhance children’s creativity through the development of ideas about school furniture based on their daily experience in their classroom.

Paramita Atmodiwirjo and Noor Istiani PowerPoint

Paramita Atmodiwirjo and Noor Istiani Paper

 

Day 2 – Session 15:

3.10pam – 3.35pm

Reinforcing notions of duty and rights

Geetanee Napal, University of Mauritius, Mauritius

 

Abstract

If educators are to achieve the life-wide formation of students, ethics in the form of a moral law of duty, founded on pragmatism, should be reinforced. Every citizen has a right to appropriate access to a good education, hence the need for an interdependent society where the recognition of specific rights necessitates the acceptance of corresponding duties. Duty is a core dimension in the conceptualization of a healthy community, where citizens believe in and respect contractual notions of rights and duties. As a core ethic, the concept of duty operates at different levels of concern and community, eventually pointing to global notions of ethics.

While there is wide consensus on the key role of education at imparting values, educators have a significant input in ensuring that the process works for all their stakeholders. Any educator is to fulfill the distinct role of communicator and provider of knowledge, in addition to acting as learning facilitator and transmitter of cultural heritage, if he is to achieve the life-wide formation of students under his responsibility. The participative rights of parents, children and teachers in the process of schooling can significantly contribute to the proper development of young students.

There are rights, duties, responsibilities and accountabilities to consider, bearing in mind that duty cannot be dissociated from rights. Duty and virtues are complementary in an education system where the objective is to equip students for life.

This paper addresses the role of educators from the perspective of duty as a core ethic, bearing in mind the various functions that an educator is expected to accomplish.

 

Geetanee Napal PowerPoint

Geetanee Napal Paper

 

 

3.35pm – 3.50pm Afternoon tea

 

Day 2 – Session 16:

3.50pm – 4.50pm

Discussion session towards establishment of International Association for Lifewide Learning (IAFLL) as formal structure for

  • networking by educators engaged in lifewide educational research and programs and as
  • umbrella organization for convening future ICOLACE conferences.

 

 4.50pm

Official close of conference by Chairperson